tonya greg rynerson Federal Bail Bonds Service Nationwide

HOW FEDERAL BONDS WORK

When a person is charged with a federal crime, the defendant will need to appear before a judge to be arraigned to determine if they will be permitted bail.   During their arraignment hearing the judge will grant one of the following:

  • Release on personal recognizance
  • Release on bail without restrictions
  • Detention without bail
  • Release on bail with restrictions, such as:  a)  Mandatory drug and alcohol testing;   b)  Release with GPS monitoring;  c)  Being required to report to a pre-trial services agency on a regular basis; or   d) Court-mandated psychological or psychiatric evaluation(s)

Federal inmates can be looked up on the Federal Bureau of Prisons website. For complete information about federal bail, call us now, toll-free nationwide: 888-BAIL-BOND (1-888-224-5266).  Note that our large network of professional bondsman allows us to efficiently  handle Federal Bail Bonds in any jurisdiction in the entire United States.

COST OF FEDERAL BAIL

The standard premium charged for federal bail bond is 15% of the total bail amount.  This means if federal bail has been set at $100,000 you can expect to pay a federal bail bondsman $15,000 for their services.   These types of bonds require more work on behalf of the bail bondsman and are considered to be a greater risk which is why they are more costly.

Another differing factor between federal bail bonds and state criminal bail bonds is that federal bonds require collateral, such as property.   Collateral is collected in order to ensure the conditions of the bond are met and that the defendant will appear in court when required.  As with criminal bonds, as long as the defendant adheres with the stipulation(s) of their release, the collateral will be returned to the person who posted it at the conclusion of the defendant’s case.

To discuss cost, payment and collateral on federal bonds, call 24×7: 888-BAIL-BOND (1-888-224-5266).

WHAT MAKES FEDERAL BONDS DIFFERENT

Because federal criminal law and state criminal law operate differently, each has a slightly different process when it comes to bail bonds.

In the state court system defendants are almost always permitted to post a bail bond so they can get out of jail awaiting trial.  Once a person has been arrested and booked, the crime they have been charged with is then cross referenced with the county’s bail schedule. This bail schedule is set annually by a panel of judges and it provides a guideline as to how much bail should be set at based on the severity of the crime committed, whether the defendant has a prior history of arrest and whether they are deemed to be a flight risk.

Federal bail bonds are similar to criminal bail bonds on the state level.  Both serve as a guarantee that a defendant will appear back in court, when mandated, so that a judge may decide their case.  However, whereas a state criminal bail bond guarantees the appearance of a defendant who has been charged with committing a crime against the state, federal bonds guarantee the appearance of a defendant who has been charged with committing a crime against the U.S.  There are more than 100 categories of offenses blanketed as being federal crimes and more than 4,500  crimes considered to be federal offenses.

Note:  This link includes great information for the federal criminal process.

Examples of federal crimes include:

  • Most types of fraud including but not limited to bank fraud, securities fraud and wire fraud
  • Computer Hacking
  • Counterfeiting
  • Customs Violations
  • Kidnapping
  • Espionage
  • Terrorism
  • Drug Sales
  • Drug Trafficking
  • Crimes committed on federal property
  • Crimes committed at airports

24-HOUR SERVICE

A representative from our company is available to speak with you 24-hours a day, 7-days a week.  We can also assist you process your paperwork via phone, fax and email.    Call us any time, day or night 888-BAIL-BOND or at 1-888-224-5266 for fast, courteous and confidential service.

We offer additional information for federal bail bonds in California.

Last Updated 11/26/2013